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Other Academic Policies & Regulations

Advisors

Students are assigned to registration advisors for assistance with online registration and program progress review. Faculty advisors are also assigned to students in degree and certificate programs to assist with academic and vocation advising.

Students are responsible for monitoring their academic progression through careful study of their transcripts using the Coursework Review forms in the Form Center in the Student Computer Room and on AMOS.

Students in the MDiv program, who are also candidates for ordination are responsible for meeting both Seminary and denominational requirements.

Either a student or an advisor may request a change of advisor by contacting the Office of Enrollment.

Academic Load

The full-time semester academic load is 12-16 credit hours. Students must have a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better in order to request permission from the faculty to take an overload.

Faculty approval of academic load is necessary when work outside the student's academic program requirements exceeds 20 hours per week. Approval is based on the student's academic ability, workload, and other circumstances. Normally in these circumstances academic studies will be limited to 12 credit hours per semester.

Academic Probation & Discontinuance

Discontinuance in the First Term

In the first term of study at MTS, any student who achieves less than 1.0 GPA may be discontinued.

Students Admitted on Academic Probation

  • Students whose undergraduate GPA is less than 2.75 may be admitted on academic probation to a degree or certificate program or permitted to enroll in courses as a non-degree student.
  • Full time students admitted on academic probation are expected to achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.75 by the end of their first semester.  Part time students are expected to achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.75 after they have completed one full academic year.
  • Failure to achieve a grade point average of 2.75 within these time frames will be sufficient grounds for review by the Admissions and Standing Committee and may result in discontinuance from the program. Students who have been discontinued may file an appeal to the Associate Provost.

Continuing Students

  • Students must achieve and maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.75 through all terms of study, regardless of the number of credits earned or attempted towards the degree.  Students are permitted one semester of probation in which they may attempt to remedy the GPA deficit.
  • When a student's cumulative GPA falls below 2.75 the student will be placed on academic probation. Students on academic probation must achieve at least a 2.75 grade point average at end of the next Fall or Spring semester in which they are enrolled.
  • Students on academic probation who fail to achieve a 2.75 GPA after the designated semester will be reviewed by the Admissions and Standing Committee and may be discontinued from the program. Students who have been discontinued may file an appeal to the Associate Provost.
  • Financial aid eligibility is affected during the period of academic probation. See "Financial Aid booklet" for more information.

Academic Year

The academic year is divided into four terms — two semesters (fall and spring), a January term and a Summer term. The academic year begins with the fall semester. The fall and spring semesters are each 15 weeks long.  

Auditing Courses

A student interested in becoming familiar with the content of a course without the constraints of credit work may register for a course as an auditor.

Initial requests to audit courses should be processed through the Office of Enrollment. After the first audit, requests should be processed by the Registrar. The appropriate office will contact the instructor/s to request permission for the audit.

Admission into a class as an auditor is based upon academic record (including official transcript/s from approved undergraduate school/s) and the instructor's approval.

Prior to the start of class, auditors are responsible for meeting with the instructor to establish their level of engagement in the class.

Auditors are not expected to submit written work or to take examinations, nor should they expect the instructor to evaluate their work. The student must attend a minimum of two-thirds of the class meetings of the course in order for an audit to be recorded on a transcript.

A change from credit to audit status or a change from audit to credit status, must be carried out within the drop/add period and may effect tuition charges.

Auditors may request Continuing Education Units (CEUs) from the Registrar.

Requests by current students in good standing to audit a course should be processed through the Registrar. During a Seminary career, a student with a GPA of 3.0 or higher may audit up to six hours of coursework at no charge. Full-time students may audit only one course per semester. Part-time students may audit one course after completing twelve credit hours and another after completing an additional twelve credit hours. After a student has audited six hours of coursework at no cost, additional audits may be taken at the normal auditing fee.

MTS alumni and senior citizens may register to audit one course per semester at the special tuition rates.

Spouses/partners of current students may audit courses under the following terms:
• of full-time students in good standing may audit one class per semester at no charge. 
• of part-time students in good standing may audit one class per semester at no charge
   for every 12 credit hours completed by the student. 
• Additional classes may be taken at the regular auditing fee.

Background Checks

All students directly engaged in ministry/counseling as part of their Seminary program, with responsibility for individuals within a congregation, community agency or other ministry setting, are required to file the appropriate background record checks with the Registrar. Consult with the Registrar to obtain the appropriate forms and listing of courses requiring background record checks.

The cost of acquiring these record checks is the responsibility of the student.

These documents must be current and on file before a student may participate in a Clinical or Supervised Ministry placement or register for specific courses.

Changing Degree Programs

Students who desire to change from one degree program to another (or to a certificate) program must submit the following to the Admissions and Standing Committee:

1. a one-page statement for their reasons for changing programs 
2. a completed essay appropriate to the degree or certificate to which they are apply; 
3. any additional requirements, such as references, appropriate to the degree or certificate.

Commencement Policy

Revised by Faculty February 2017

Students who have successfully completed their degree requirements or who have successfully completed a course of study leading to a certificate awarded by the faculty may participate in the Commencement service.

Normally, students who have not fulfilled all the requirements for a degree or certificate from Moravian Seminary are not allowed to participate in Commencement activities. Exceptions to this policy will be considered for students who fulfill all the following conditions:

  • They are not on academic probation and have an overall GPA of at least 2.75.
  • Due to circumstances beyond their control, they are no more than 3 credits short of the credits required for the degree or certificate.
  • They could reasonably be expected to complete their requirements by August 31 in the same calendar year.
  • They have no outstanding incompletes on their transcripts.

Students who meet these requirements and wish to participate in the graduation ceremonies must appeal in writing to the Seminary Dean on or before April 1 in the year of the anticipated Commencement and should specify the special circumstances that warrant the exception. No petitions for participating will be accepted after April 1. Appeals of the decision of the Seminary Dean may be made to the Seminary faculty. Appeals beyond the faculty may be heard by the president at his discretion. In order to participate in Commencement, students whose appeals are approved must have registered and fully paid for the required summer session courses by April 15 of that year. Tuition for said summer courses is non-refundable.

Students who complete their final credits after graduation will have their name printed in the Commencement program, but will be unable to receive honors (e.g., cum laude) at the ceremony. If after all summer grades are calculated and the student earns honors, the student's diploma will note the honors. Students who participate in the Commencement ceremony without having completed degree requirements will have transcripts withheld until the completion of all requirements

No student with a failing grade in any course in the spring term immediately prior to Commencement may participate in the ceremony. No student with a pending incomplete in any course in the spring term immediately prior to Commencement may participate in the ceremony.

More information for Seniors who complete their requirements in the summer term.

 

Continuing Ed Requirements

Students in degree programs are required to participate in a minimum number of continuing education events throughout the course of their program as follows:

  • MDiv - 6 programs 
  • MACC - 4 programs 
  • MATS - 4 programs
  • MACh - 4 programs

Any continuing education event offered by MTS or by a student's judicatory, denominational office, or counseling/credentialing organization are automatically eligible to count toward the requirement.

Other continuing education programs, such as those offered by any LVAIC school (Moravian College, Muhlenberg College, Lehigh University, Lafayette College, Cedar Crest College, DeSales University), need approval by the Seminary Registrar.  Pre-approval of the event is strongly encouraged.

Generally, approval of such other events is based on three criteria:

  1. Content of the event
  2. Relevancy to one's course of study
  3. Qualifications of the provider

A  multi-day event will not necessarily count for more than one continuing education program.  This will be evaluated on a case by case basis. 

If attendance at an event is a class requirement, the event does NOT count toward fulfilling this requirement.  If the event is an optional assignment on a class syllabus, the event DOES count toward fulfilling this requirement.

SUBMITTING PROOF OF ATTENDANCE: Proof of participation must be submitted following the event. Documentation could be in the form of a CEU certificate, an original program from the event, or other proof of participation that identifies the event and the date it occurred. Sign and date the certificate, program, etc., and turn it in to the Seminary Registrar’s office within the semester that you attend the event.

Course Exemptions

Any student whose preparation indicates prior coverage of the material of a required Seminary course may request an exemption. Students must demonstrate graduate-level proficiency in the subject matter as determined by the appropriate faculty members. An exemption does not reduce the number of hours required for the department. Written request for an exemption should be submitted to the Director of Enrollment at deremerd@moravian.edu.

Degree Completion Timelines

The MDiv degree and dual degrees offered by the Seminary must be completed within seven years. The MACC, MATS, and MACh degrees must be completed within six years.

Extensions beyond the stated time limits may be granted by the Admissions and Standing Committee, upon the student’s written presentation of a plan. Courses taken beyond the stated time limit may not be eligible for federal financial aid. A leave of absence stops the clock on this policy. There is a limit of 4 semesters of leave of absence. Refer to the Financial Aid booklet.

Directed Study courses

Students who have demonstrated the ability to do independent work may explore particular areas of importance and interest in a Directed Study. Directed Studies are developed in collaboration with (and at the discretion of) individual faculty members and are approved by the Dean. A Directed Study is not to be used as a substitute for a regularly offered course.

Students who have achieved a 3.0 average and above are eligible to apply for a Directed Study. A student is limited to taking a total of 9 credit hours of Directed Studies in a degree program.

The Directed Study application form, guidelines for developing a syllabus, and deadlines are found at this link.

Dropping Courses

Students may make course changes any time up through the drop/add period. No course may be added after that time.

A student may withdraw from a course at any time up to the official withdrawal deadline specified in the Seminary calendar, normally set at the day before the final four weeks of the term.  See more information here on Withdrawal from a course.

 

Grade Appeal 

Students are responsible for maintaining standards of academic performance and integrity. Students, however, may seek review of grades that they feel were not based on considered judgment. If the question is not resolved after consultation with the instructor, it may be taken to the Seminary Dean. If further review is desired, the appeal may be taken to the Associate Provost.

Grade appeals must be initiated according to the following timeframe: Appeals of grades given in the spring or summer terms must be initiated before the end of the fourth week of the subsequent fall semester. Appeals of grades given in the fall or January terms must be initiated before the end of the fourth week of the subsequent spring semester.

Grading Policy

At the conclusion of each term, a student’s performance will be evaluated by a grade, which is determined by examination, term papers and class participation; or by such methods as the instructor adopts.

Students earn grades according to the following grading rubric:

Grade

%

GPA Definition
A 100-93 4.00

Represents an exceptional level of knowledge, skills, and/or being in relation to course goals, particularly as those goals contribute to the educational outcomes of the Seminary’s degree or certificate programs.
In addition to the “minimally acceptable” levels delineated below for C and C+, work on a given assignment or
collectively for a course meets at least two of the following criteria:
• consistently demonstrates comprehensive, sophisticated understanding of content,
• consistently demonstrates high levels of skill in research or practice, also demonstrates exceptional skill
• consistently demonstrates a high degree of self-awareness and ability to reflect critically on one’s own and others’ experiences, ideas, beliefs, practices, and/or actions,
• consistently demonstrates a high level of insight, creativity, or quality of writing, expression, or action..

A- 92-90 3.67
B+ 89-87 3.33

Exceeds the acceptable level of knowledge, skills, and/or being in relation to course goals, particularly as those goals contribute to the educational outcomes of the Seminary’s degree or certificate programs.
In addition to the “minimally acceptable” levels delineated below for C and C+, work on a given assignment or
collectively for a course meets at least two of the following criteria:
• consistently demonstrates understanding of course materials, also demonstrates capacity for thorough, in-depth understanding of content,
• consistently demonstrates skill in research or practice, also demonstrates ability to achieve high levels of skill
• consistently demonstrates self-awareness and ability to reflect critically on one’s own and others’ experiences,
ideas, beliefs, practices, and/or actions
• consistently demonstrates insight, creativity, or quality of writing, expression, or action.

B 86-83 3.00
B- 82-80 2.67
C+ 79-77 2.33

Represents a minimally acceptable level of knowledge, skills, and/or being in relation to course goals, particularly as those goals contribute to the educational outcomes of the Seminary’s degree or certificate programs.
• Student work demonstrates the minimal acceptable understanding of course assignments and ability to connect them with course goals and the learning outcomes for their academic program.
• Written work and oral presentations are mostly clear, concise, well-organized, well-argued, with correct spelling, punctuation, and grammar.
• Research demonstrates the minimal acceptable use and citation of primary and secondary sources, accurately
describes the information, evidence and arguments of sources, and articulates a rationale for points of agreement or disagreement with sources.
• Student work and participation demonstrate the minimal acceptable grasp of content and development of skills
in relation to course goals and the learning outcomes for their academic program.
• Students demonstrate appropriate awareness of their own assumptions and presuppositions, and display the
minimal acceptable ability to reflect critically on their own experiences, ideas, beliefs, practices, and/or actions.
• Students demonstrate respectful engagement with the experiences, ideas, beliefs, practices, and/or actions of
diverse others and display an acceptable ability to reflect on their impact on others or others’ impact on them.
• Student work meets standards of academic honesty. Their work also consistently meets stated deadlines,
addresses assigned topics, and contributes to a positive educational climate in the classroom.

C 76-73 2.00
C- 72-70 1.67 Represents work that is below the minimally acceptable level of knowledge, skills, and/or being as described in the criteria for C or C+. Also note the statement above related to reasons why a student might receive a grade below C in a course or on an assignment..
D+ 69-67 1.33
D 66-63 1.00
D- 62-60 0.67
F 59-0 0.00 Represents work that is significantly below minimally acceptable level as described in the criteria for C or C+. Also note the statement above related to reasons why a student might receive a grade below C in a course or on an assignment. Examples include but are not limited to missing deadlines, violations of the Academic Honesty
guidelines, consistently misunderstanding assignments, significant lack of critical reflection on one’s own experiences, ideas, beliefs, practices, and/or actions, etc. .

A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75 is required for the degree.

REQUIRED COURSES: A student must make a grade of C or higher on required courses. If a student receives a grade of C- or below in a required course for a degree or certificate program, the student may repeat the course no more than one time. When a required course is repeated, the original course and grade remain on the transcript. If the required course (or its equivalent) is taken and the grade meets the criteria above (or the criteria for transfer of credit) only the grade of the new course will be factored into the student's GPA. Typically, if the second time taking the course the student receives a grade below C, the student is terminated from the program.

ELECTIVES: If a student receives an F or NP (No Pass) in an elective, the student may repeat the course no more than one time. When an elective is repeated, the original course and grade remain on the transcript. If the elective is repeated, only the grade of the new course will be factored into the student's GPA.

All course grades turned into the Registrar are final and cannot be changed unless a mathematical error can be shown in the computation or the grade is changed following a formal academic grievance process.

P/NP Pass/No Pass

Certain courses are graded on a Pass or No Pass basis as noted in the course description.

Pass - 73% or above. The grade of P appears on the transcript, student receives credit for the course, there is no effect on the GPA.

No Pass = Below 73%. If the course is required it must be retaken. The grade of NP appears on the transcript, student receives no credit for the course, there is no effect on GPA.

F = 0%. Can be assigned if there is a violation of the Academic Honesty policy. The grade of F appears on the transcript, no credit is received for the course, the grade is calculated in the student's GPA.

INC Incomplete See Policy on Incomplete
W Withdraw

W indicates Withdrawal from a course before completion. W is assigned for all withdrawals prior to the official withdrawal deadline, normally before the last four weeks of a term.

W does not affect the cumulative GPA.

W/F Withdraw/Fail

WF is assigned if the withdrawal takes place after the official withdrawal deadline (normally before the last four weeks of a term). Exceptions can be made in cases of illness or other extenuating circumstances by the Seminary Dean who may authorize a grade of W.

A WF is computed as an F in the GPA.

AUD Audit See policy on Audit

Academic Honors – Seniors with a final GPA of 3.9 and above will graduate "With Distinction"

Incomplete 

Approved by faculty 12/05/2015

In the case of extraordinary circumstances, an incomplete may be granted for a course at the discretion of the instructor and under the terms established by the instructor.

An application for an Incomplete must be submitted to the Registrar by end of last day of class of the term. The application must be signed by the instructor and the student's advisor. Signatures can be digital.

Students granted an Incomplete for a course should expect to earn one letter grade lower in the course than they would have earned if the work had been completed on time. Typically, no more than one Incomplete is permitted in any given term.

The deadline for the completion of an Incomplete is determined by the instructor, but the final deadline for incompletes is 30 calendar days from the end of the term in which the course was taken.

Assignments not turned in before the deadline for the incomplete will be recorded as a zero. It is responsibility of the student to meet these deadlines and make sure that assignments are submitted to the instructor on time.

In the case of multiple incompletes courses, as student may not enroll in further courses until all incompletes are resolved.                     

Leave of Absence

A student in good standing who encounters unforeseen circumstances necessitating an interruption of studies should consult with their advisor, and with their advisor's approval, may apply to the Director of Enrollment for a leave of absence. Forms for applying for a Leave of Absence are available in the Form Center in the Student Computer Room.

If the leave of absence is granted, the time limit for completing the degree shall be extended by the length of the leave, not to exceed a total of two years.

A leave of absence will affect financial aid eligibility. A federal loan borrower on academic leave of absence will be considered as “not enrolled” and may go into repayment status during the leave of absence. Refund Policy.

Pass/No Pass

Policy updated on March 24, 2008

Certain courses are graded on a Pass or No Pass basis as noted in the course description.

Pass - 73% or above. The grade of P appears on the transcript, student receives credit for the course, there is no effect on the GPA.

No Pass = Below 73%. The grade of NP appears on the transcript, student receives no credit for the course, there is no effect on GPA. If the course is required, it must be retaken.

F = 0%. Can be assigned if there is a violation of the Academic Honesty policy. The grade of F appears on the transcript, no credit is received for the course, the grade is calculated in the student's GPA.

Readmission after Dismissal

Process for considering a student who requests admission to Moravian Theological Seminary after having previously been dismissed/expelled from Moravian College, the Comenius Center or Moravian Theological Seminary.

A previously dismissed/expelled student who wishes to apply to any division of the institution must submit a written petition that will be reviewed by a three-member panel consisting of the person in each division with ultimate responsibility for student disciplinary matters or her or his designee.  (Under the institution's current structure, those individuals are the VPSA, Dean/VP of the Seminary, and Grad Program Dean).  A student who has been dismissed/expelled may not petition for readmission until a minimum of five years has elapsed since the dismissal/expulsion. 

The panel will determine, by simple majority vote, whether the former student is eligible to have her or his application considered.  In arriving at a decision, the panel will look for the following:

  • evidence that the individual understands that what he or she did was wrong;
  • evidence of remorse, personal growth, change in behavior;
  • evidence of having achieved something with her or his life or of contribution to society;
  • having paid a debt to society (e.g. as a result of imprisonment or other judicial penalties);
  • having gone through rehabilitation;
  • evidence that the individual is not perceived as being a danger to anyone.

The panel, at its discretion, may invite the former student to meet in person with the panel to answer questions.  The panel may, at its discretion, request and consider information, testimony, reference letters, or comments from other individuals, both those who are or have been part of the Moravian community and those outside the community.

If the panel approves the petition, the former student's application will then go through the regular review and decision-making process for the program in question.  (i.e. The panel is not deciding acceptance to the program.)  The decision of the panel as to whether or not to permit the former student to apply will be final.  No appeals will be considered. 

Refund

The engagement of faculty and contracts for services represent fixed costs to which the Seminary must obligate itself in advance for an entire academic year. The Seminary recognizes, however, that a student who finds it necessary to withdraw early in a term suffers a heavy financial loss. The following refund policy reflects the Seminary’s willingness to share that loss with the student.

1. Tuition and Other Fee Adjustment Schedule
     If a student withdraws from the Seminary or drops to part-time status within the 60% point of the semester, charges will be adjusted according to the following schedule.

• On or before the first day of class: 100% of tuition and other fees will be cancelled.
• After the first day of class but within the 60% point of the semester: tuition and other fees will be adjusted based on the number of calendar days remaining in the semester divided by the number of calendar days in the semester, excluding scheduled breaks of five or more consecutive days.
• After the 60% point of the semester: no adjustment is made in tuition and other fees.

2. Dropping Courses
     Full time students (12-15 credit hours/semester) who drop to part-time status (fewer than 12 credits) without replacing an equal number of credits in the same session will receive an adjustment of tuition on those courses dropped within the 60% point of the semester and will be billed at the part-time tuition rate for the remaining credits.
      It is the student’s responsibility to contact the Office of Enrollment to verify the effect that any change in course load will have on the student’s financial aid eligibility.

3. Financial Aid Reimbursement
     Because financial aid is expected to help meet educational costs, any tuition and fee adjustment up to the amount of financial aid received will be calculated and reimbursed to the source of the aid, such as federal, state or institutional aid programs. Normally, the amount returned to each source will be proportional to the amount received, unless federal, state or other guidelines direct differently.

     Moravian Theological Seminary follows the federal guidelines for the return of Title IV funds (Stafford Loans). The priority for return of financial aid is as follows:

1. Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans
2. Subsidized Federal Stafford Loans
3. Federal PLUS Loans 
3. Other federal or state financial aid, as required
4. Institutional aid
5. Other funds as required

4. Reimbursement to Student
      A student may be eligible to be reimbursed a portion of the amount paid after all Federal Title IV funds and other financial aid programs are reimbursed as required, and all outstanding balances with the Seminary have been cleared. Private or alternative loans borrowed by or for the student, if any, are included with the student reimbursement amount.

5. Leave of Absence Policy
       A federal loan borrower on academic leave of absence will be considered as “not enrolled” and may go into repayment status during the leave of absence.
      Moravian Theological Seminary's academic Leave of Absence Policy does not apply for purposes of financial aid.

6. Withdrawal from the Seminary
     A student pursuing a degree who withdraws from the Seminary for any reason shall notify the Dean in writing within thirty (30) days of withdrawing from class(es), noting the reasons for withdrawal. If the student is in good standing at the time of the withdrawal and has notified the Dean in writing, no application for readmission is necessary, but the time limit for completion of the degree established at the student’s initial date of enrollment must be respected. 
     If the student is not in good standing, for academic or other reasons, and withdraws voluntarily, the permission of the Admissions and Standing Committee is required for readmission. A student who withdraws without notifying the Dean in writing shall cease to be a degree candidate and shall be eligible for readmission only by action of the Admissions and Standing Committee.

7. Notes on Refund Policy

a. The withdrawal date is the date on which the Seminary office receives official notice in writing that the student has withdrawn or the date on which the Seminary Registrar determines that the student has withdrawn, whichever is earlier.

b. A student who is required to withdraw for disciplinary reasons is not eligible for an institutional refund.

c. Upon request, a detailed official policy is available in the Office of Enrollment and the Bursar’s Office.

d. Dropping out of some, but not all classes is not considered a withdrawal, though adjustments to financial aid may be required depending on circumstances. (See Dropping Courses)

e. M-Flex Dollars will be refunded to a student who has withdrawn, to the amount of unused dollars.

f. If funds are released to a student because of a credit balance on the student’s account, prior to a student’s withdrawal or change in registration status, the student may be required to refund some federal loan money.

g. Refunds will be determined, processed and paid 30 calendar days after the date of withdrawal.

Questions about the Seminary’s Refund Policy and its application to particular cases may be addressed to the Director of Enrollment or the Bursar. Appeals concerning the application of this policy may be made in writing to Mark Reed, Vice President for Administration, Colonial Hall, for final determination (1200 Main St., Bethlehem, PA 18018).

Repeating a Course

REQUIRED COURSES: A student must make a grade of C or higher on required courses. If a student receives a grade of C- or below in a required course for a degree or certificate program, the student may repeat the course no more than one time. When a required course is repeated, the original course and grade remain on the transcript. If the required course (or its equivalent) is taken and the grade meets the criteria above (or the criteria for transfer of credit) only the grade of the new course will be factored into the student's GPA. Typically, if the second time taking the course the student receives a grade below C, the student is terminated from the program.

ELECTIVES: If a student receives an F or NP (No Pass) in an elective, the student may repeat the course no more than one time. When an elective is repeated, the original course and grade remain on the transcript. If the elective is repeated, only the grade of the new course will be factored into the student's GPA.

Room Reservation

Rooms in the Bahnson Center may be reserved for group activities, meetings, etc. Reservations should be requested through Elizabeth Johnson, at 610-861-1516.

Transfer of Credits

Students who wish to transfer credits to MTS from other accredited institutions must complete the application and admissions process required of all degree students and request a transfer credit evaluation. Up to half of the credits required in the student’s degree program may be granted on the basis of transfer credits (e.g., not more than 45 credits may be granted in a 90 credit program).

In considering coursework for transfer credit, MTS will accept only courses taken at seminaries accredited by the Association of Theological Schools (ATS) or through graduate level programs offered by regionally-accredited institutions. Transfer credit will only be given for courses in which a student has received a grade of B- or better. Courses considered for transfer must have been taken within 10 years of the expected date of graduation from MTS.

Students wishing to receive transfer credit for courses taken before admission to MTS must meet with the Director of Enrollment and complete the Transfer Credit Request form. A syllabus will be required for each course requested for transfer credit.

Students wishing to receive transfer credit for courses to be taken at another school after admission to MTS must apply in advance of taking the course for a determination of the course's equivalency to fulfill degree requirements at MTS. Students must meet with the Director of Enrollment and complete the Transfer Credit Request form. A syllabus may be required for each course requested for transfer credit.

Students may transfer credits from a degree completed at MTS, into another degree program at MTS, provided the transfer credits from the first degree will be earned within 10 years of graduation from the second degree. The degree requiring the fewest number of credits is used to determine how many credits can be transferred. Up to half of the credits from the degree requiring the fewest number, can be transferred — either in or out. (e.g. a student completed the 90 credit MDiv and now wants to take the 62 credit MACC. The 62 credit MACC requires the fewer number of credits, so up to half can be transferred into it - or 31 credits from the MDiv.)

Withdrawal from a Degree Program

A student who wishes to withdraw from a degree program for any reason shall notify the Dean in writing, noting the reasons for withdrawal.  The decision to withdraw is a serious one.  The Seminary requires students to discuss withdrawal plans with their academic advisor.

The effective date of withdrawal is the date that the Dean receives the letter requesting withdrawal from the degree program.  The effective date of withdrawal is also used to determine the adjustment of tuition, fees, and financial aid.

Once the withdrawal process is initiated, a student who changes his/her mind about withdrawing from a degree program may do so by rescinding the withdrawal in writing to the Dean.  If the separation is to take effect at a time when classes are in session, the rescission must occur within ten calendar days from when the process was initiated.

Resident students must vacate their housing unit within 15 business days of their withdrawal date. When a resident student withdraws and vacates a Seminary housing unit, the rent for the month of vacancy will be pro-rated based on the number of days of occupancy.

Note that the student’s transcript will not be released until the withdrawal process is complete.
Withdrawal from classes and/or a degree program has implications for financial aid eligibility.  Financial aid refund policy.

Re-admission
Students who have withdrawn from their degree program must apply to the Admissions & Standing committee for re-admission. If the student is re-admitted, the committee will determine the conditions that pertain to student’s acceptance into a degree program.


 

Research and Writing

Duplicating and Printing

A copier for student use is located in the Student Computer/Work Room. User directions are posted near the copier. In addition, copiers in the Haupert Union Building and Reeves Library are available to students.

The staff/faculty copier is reserved for official business. With advanced notice large orders for Seminary student body activities may be produced through the institutional Duplicating Office (basement of Colonial Hall).

The computer lab in Bahnson Center is available to enrolled students 24 hours/day, 7 days/week with identification card swipe access. The computers allow for campus network access and are equipped with various software packages. There is also a printer available for use.

 

Inclusive Language

Moravian College is committed to a tolerant, fair-minded, and respectful campus community. Faculty, staff, and students have an ongoing responsibility to avoid using discriminatory language, because its use is potentially damaging to others in both work and learning environments.

Moravian College strongly encourages the use of inclusive language in all academic and organizational communication, whether written or spoken. In our diverse College community, inclusive language reflects an attitude of openness toward others and respect for their life’s experiences. Inclusive language avoids false assumptions about others and works to overcome barriers between individuals and among communities in such areas as gender, race, class, age, physical differences, ethnicity, religious beliefs, sexual orientation, marital status, and disability.

Guidelines for Inclusive Language at Moravian Theological Seminary

The following guidelines are to assist students in meeting the Seminary's policy on the use of inclusive language. This statement is adapted from a brochure "The Use of Inclusive Language in the Worship of the Church" produced by Wesley Theological Seminary (1982).

Rationale for Inclusive Language

The Gospel of Jesus Christ is a message to all people in all places. Jesus reached out to men and women, poor and rich, to bring all people into God's fold. The kingdom of God includes all types of people; therefore, our language should reflect this inclusivity and equality among the people of God. Traditional language is often sexist in that the ideal person or the universal person is male. Thus, people often say "a man" when they mean "a person." Sexist, limited language can cause great harm in a church committed to unity and equality.

Moravian Theological Seminary endorses and requires the use of inclusive language (which intentionally includes men and women) in all written work.

Principles and Examples of Inclusive Language

Freedom to adapt materials

a. Students are expected to use inclusive language in all original compositions (i.e., papers and sermons).

b. Hymns in the public domain (materials not protected by copyright) may be freely adapted for inclusive language, such as one may translate a hymn into another language. It is wise to see if a piece is under copyright, and, if it is, to request permission of the author. This holds true whenever a hymn is reproduced, even if no changes are made.

c. Direct scriptural quotations should be altered only if allowed by the original language. In other words, be prepared to translate a passage from the original Greek or Hebrew before changing the language. It is helpful to consult several versions (RSV, NIV, TEV, etc.); however, one should use a single version throughout a worship service.

d. Liturgies and responsive readings which paraphrase scripture may be altered for worship purposes.

e. Quotations from other documents or writers should not be altered, but may be paraphrased if desired.

Use of language for human beings

a. Alternative terms for mankind/sons of God/brothers

- people of God
- people
- sons and daughters of God
- humanity
- heirs of God
- persons
- the family of God
- everyone
- the family of faith
- all
- kindred
- folk

b. Use of plural pronouns instead of singular ones

Exclusive: The preacher who uses exclusive language will soon discover that he is in hot water with some of his listeners.
Inclusive: Preachers who use exclusive language will soon discover that they are in hot water with some of their listeners.

Inclusive language concerning God

In using language about God, we must hold to two basic theological principles regarding God. One, God is personal. Two, God is beyond human characteristics and limits; therefore, God is not a sexual being.

This is sometimes difficult to do. If one uses the neuter pronoun "it" to describe God, one depersonalizes God in the process. However, to use the pronoun "he" makes God male. Some people solve this dilemma by never using pronouns for God at all. This however, may be awkward and impersonal.

One acceptable approach is to reduce the number of pronouns while increasing the number of feminine images for God. Traditionally, churches have failed to use the feminine images for God contained in the Bible (e.g. Deut. 32:18, Isa. 42:14, Isa. 46:3-4, Matt. 23:37).

Aesthetic Concerns

While inclusive language and theology are certainly important considerations, concern for aesthetics and clarity should not be lost. Students are expected to respect the rules of grammar while using inclusive language. This requires much work in some cases. Some hymns or liturgies may have to be discarded or completely rewritten while others may be simply adapted to fit current needs.

The Bookstore generally stocks inclusive language resources, and instructors are always willing to help students find inclusive means of expression. There are no uniform answers to the problem of sex-biased language, but through concerted efforts workable solutions can be found.

 

Writing Support

Students whose first language is not English may need writing support during their degree program. The Seminary can provide a writing tutor to help these students become more proficient with writing in English at the master's level. 

Students in need of language/writing support must be referred by their instructor to the Dean.  The Dean will inform the Director of Administration of an approval, who in turn will arrange for the student and writing tutor to work together.

The Seminary will contract with the writing tutor and cover their hourly fee up to a specific number of hours/academic year outlined in the chart below.  Students may continue to work with the writing tutor after the Seminary-covered hours are met by personally contracting with the writing tutor. 

The writing tutor will track the hours spent per student on the biweekly timesheet.

Hours of Writing/Language Support
Academic Year 1 - 12 hours
Academic Year 2 - 10 hours
Academic Year 3 - 8 hours

MATS Thesis - 8 hours